Gymnasium schedule at Burning Man 2017

In a couple of weeks, our theme camp Gymnasium will come again to the much anticipated Burning Man festival. If you read this and plan to be there, I’m pretty sure you’ll want to visit our camp.  You can read about our theme camp idea on its page and check out our last year’s experience.

 

Below is the list of our events, but keep in mind that we plan to do even more than we have announced – so stop by our camp at 7:30 Plaza and you’ll find something fun to do and learn… all in the buff! For example, we got a gymnastics wheel last year, which turned to be a hugely popular toy, and this year we’ll add an aerial rig to our arsenal! And what is amazing is that even our busy schedule is just a tiny fraction of all the “craziness” that Burning Man is!

  • Butt-Cheeky Run Come get your burn started – with the sun’s soft caresses on your butt cheeks! The Ancient Greeks always trained and competed naked – in fact the ’gym’ comes from the word ‘gymnos’, meaning ‘naked’ in Greek. Come experience the freedom of running together in the altogether! Or at least come and see what a great spectator sport it is:) We’ll do a warm-up at the camp and then run wild in the ‘hood and all the way to the Man!
    • Monday, 28 August, 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
  • Naked Oil Wrestling Wrestling is one of the most fun sports you can ever try. It’s also one of humanity’s oldest and was among the major events of the original Olympics. Long before we were kicking balls around we were rolling around in the dirt, putting each other in headlocks! It doesn’t matter if you’re a complete novice who’s never tried it in your life or an experienced fighter, come along and experience this amazing bonding experience in Gymnasium, Black Rock City’s Ancient Greek wrestling school!
    • Tuesday, 29 August, 3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    • Thursday, 31 August, 3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    • Saturday, 2 September, 3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
  • Discus-ish Throw in the dark… and in the buff Discus (well, LED-lit frisbee) throw competition followed by ultimate frisbee game (or regular frisbee, depending on the mood). Bare your body, but wear lights! The Ancient Greeks always trained and competed naked – in fact the ’gym’ comes from the word ‘gymnos’, meaning ‘naked’ in Greek. Come experience the amazing freedom of running and jumping and exercising free of clothing! Or at least come and see what a great spectator sport it is:) This is our only night event, but don’t worry about cold – movement will keep you warm!
    • Wednesday, 30 August, 8 p.m. – 9 p.m.
    • Friday, 1 September, 8 p.m. – 9 p.m. (rain date)
  • Naked Piggy-Back and Wheelbarrow Run Race are with us for this fun athletic event! Bring your friends, but choose wisely, as you’ll have to bear them on your back, bareback… or vice versa. Great bonding experience guaranteed! The Ancient Greeks always trained and competed naked – in fact the ’gym’ comes from the word ‘gymnos’, meaning ‘naked’ in Greek. Come experience the amazing freedom of running and jumping and exercising free of clothing! Or at least come and see what a great spectator sport it is:) PS In ancient Olympics this would have been an equestrian event, but BMORG wouldn’t let us bring horses…
    • Friday, 1 September,  4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
  • Nude Yoga + Wine Nude yoga and acro-yoga – for a better flow and connection 🙂 We’ll end the session with drinking wine in your favorite poses, as Ancient Greeks sometimes drank wine in acrobatic poses at their symposiums. Then you could stay for our philosophical discussions sessions. Free your body, free your mind!
    • Monday, 28 August, 4:45 p.m. – 6 p.m.
    • Wednesday, 30 August, 4:45 p.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Naked Philosophy Nudity has the power to surprise and shock, yet why, on reflection, can something as mundane as the naked body inspire simultaneously so much passion and revulsion? To be naked in 21st century western society demands intense self-examination, the questioning and reappraisal of conventional conventions and morality. In this sense, naturism, as the cultural and political movement of nudism is often known, is an inherently philosophical practice. And what better way to do philosophy than naked? We’re sure your college seminars would have been much more fun nude. Come and join us for lively discussions, debates and story-telling. We’ll be discussing naturism, body image, sharing experiences, debating body modification, if and how laws should be changed – really everything related to the human body.
    • Monday, 28 August, 6 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.
    • Wednesday, 30 August, 6 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.
    • Friday, 1 September, 6 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.
  • Kerameikos (Ancient Greek pottery) Ever wondered how those ancient vases were produced and decorated? Find out at our pottery school at Gymnasium, and you’ll be able to make some ceramics (kerameikos) of your own! It’s a three step process: first, we’ll make the vases of different shapes using coil building techniques; then, we will let the clay dry to apply the slip and carve designs. (You can use the break for lunch or try some of our big toys, such as aerial rig or gymnastics wheel). At the last stage, the pots have to be fired after Burning Man, but we could ship your masterpiece to you, if you’d like! Otherwise, we’ll use it to decorate our camp and use the most appealing ones to award the winners of our athletic events next year.

 

Hope to see many of you there!

‘Tis Hamlet’s character. “Naked!” – see it for yourself at a performance in NYC parks!

There have been countless interpretations of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, but this summer Torn Out Theater has presented perhaps the boldest version and at the same time also the truest to the character. After all, Hamlet himself wrote to Claudius: “High and mighty, You shall know I am set naked on your kingdom”, – to which he confirmed: “‘Tis Hamlet’s character. ‘Naked!'” You may argue that there is no need for such literal interpretation, but through this production, Torn Out Theater aims to draw attention to “fraught, complex world of male body image”.

Jake Austin Robertson as Hamlet; photo by Marjolaine Gallet.

The cast is all male, which is actually in accord with the theatrical tradition in Shakespearian times. In this respect, last year’s performance of ‘The Tempest‘ with an all-female cast was even more revolutionary. If the Tempest was played by amateurs (mostly from the Outdoor Co-ed Topless Pulp fiction Appreciation Society), this year’s production features professional actors. Jake Austin Robertson did amazing job playing Hamlet, in my opinion (and I heard the same from other spectators), and as he reveled in the press release at Pix11, nudity might have helped: “It’s a means of discovering his own truth and figuring out who he is regardless of whatever everyone else wants him to be”. However, not all actors in the play were naked, and those who were – for various periods of time. It seemed like nakedness was used as a tool to show that the character revealed his true colors, especially in emotional moments. This may be a pretty good theatrical tool to keep the audience engaged, given that there are studies showing that people are more compassionate and empathic when they see images of naked people compared to clothed people (not to mention saving money on costumes). Actors, on the other hand, get an additional way to express themselves – with the body language (and probably even without realizing it) – as such features as tension of the muscles or subtle changes in the posture would usually be concealed by costume. All this certainly worked for [spoiler alert! but you probably know the storyline to some extent anyway] the brilliantly choreographed fight scene between Hamlet and Laertes, or the final scene of Hamlet dying in the arms of Horatio.

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So, you could (should!) see it all for yourself this weekend in Prospect Park in Brooklyn or in the beginning of September in Central Park. While the more known Public Theater features Hamlet “running around in his underpants“, our advice is to check out Torn Out Theater that goes all the way! Moreover, the performance is also free of charge (but donations are encouraged). Arrive earlier to get better seating; only limited amount of chairs is available for rent – but the atmosphere has a nice picnic vibe to it, so seating on the grass is what most people opt for. Overall, it is a great idea to have this performance in the parks out in the open, which makes this theater truly public. Compared to the famous ‘Shakespeare in the Park’, this is a much more intimate, immersive show… and who knows, maybe at some point there will be a show where the audience can be naked too. This is what is going to happen during the rock musical ‘Hair’ in London.

It would be good to hear opinions of people involved in theater professionally, so feel free to leave comments here. Otherwise, I’m pretty sure there will be some coverage form a couple of major outlets soon.

hiking the Appalachian trail in Vermont… as nature intended

naturist 0004 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

Although the US has a fame for being a prude country, there are some local exceptions, and Vermont is one of them: there is no state law against public nudity (though there is one against disrobing in public :D) And with all those green mountains around (just think of the state’s name etymology), it’s a perfect destination for naturists!

My long-time pen pal Ed organizes an  annual summer solstice naked hike in Vermont, and though I could never make it for this group hike itself, I went on the same route with Ed and another friend, Matt, just later in summer (mid-August).

naturist 0000 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

The route includes a part of the famous Appalachian trail, so you’d expect a few fellow hikers, but it’s great to have the law on your side – just make sure to leave your car naked, and you don’t need to hide!-)

naturist 0003 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

Shortly after the trailhead, we got to a small waterfall

naturist 0002 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

– nice to start the hike on a fresh note!

Make sure to take advantage of this skinny-dipping spot, because after that the trail gets very steep.

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The forest is dominated by fir trees – young and old,

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and ferns are common in the undergrowth.

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But then we came across something spectacular. You may know of the hikers’ tradition to pile stones into cairns, but here it has been taken to another level!

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It looked like a miniature city lost in the woods.

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We left our contribution too, but mostly just marveled at the scale of this cairn.

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Some of the installations were amazingly balanced at the trees and appeared as if suspended in the air!

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When we got to the open space at one of the highest points of the trail, we enjoyed the great views

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and some flat rocks that served well for resting.

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What else could we ask for? Maybe some berries?

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There weren’t any edibles around (at least as fat as we could tell), but we saw some pretty fruits,

plants with berries 0001 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

including this dark-blue berry.

plants with berries 0002 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

Then there was another spot with cairns –

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not as massive but perhaps even more impressive in terms of the art of balancing those uneven stones.

view 0001 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

Yes, here hikers take cairns seriously!

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We didn’t cross many streams,

naturist 0015 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

but about two-thirds of the route we came to a lake –

view 0002 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

Little Rock Pond, actually. It was great to refresh and swim in its clear waters. There was a ranger, but again, here we didn’t have to worry that our natural attire would cause any trouble in legal terms. There were a couple more nude swimmers, and the rest didn’t seem appalled by nudity either.

But then, all of a sudden, came a heavy downpour and we had to rush out. It was actually quite a warm rain, and as you might know, the skin is waterproof – so we didn’t feel the need to wear clothes. It was an interesting experience to walk in the forest in such a heavy rain, but it did prevent us from the idea of camping there.

Next day, we explored another trail, which lead to the Stratton Pond (east of the Stratton Mountain).

naturist 0017 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

This trail was mostly flat. About midway, it passed along a mossy swamp,

view 0003 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

which provided a nice change of the scenery. However, many of the trees in the swamp were dead, and seemed to have died recently. This swamp was apparently a result of beavers building a damn on the stream there… Oh well, if only they heard about climate change challenge, maybe they’d spare some of those trees…

view 0004 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

Soon after that, we approached the lake, and of course we wanted to go for a swim.

naturist 0016 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

We took the trail around the lake (to the left) and found a nice spot for a camp (would be perfect for an overnight stay!),

view 0006 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

even with some food supplies,

view 0005 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

but more importantly – with good access to the water!

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We weren’t the only ones enjoying the water though. This pristine lake was a home to many newts

newt 0002 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

and dragonfly nymphs!

dragonfly larva 0000 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

Amazing to see insects the same size of a vertebrate next to each other, and probably if newts lived in the water at juvenile stages, they’d be hunted by dragonfly nymphs. But their life cycles are reversed: the nymphs eventually come out of water and transform into dragonflies, whereas it is the juvenile form of newts, eft, that lives on land.

newt 0000 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

The bright orange color of eft’s skin warns of its poisonous properties,

newt 0001 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

so better don’t hold them in your hands however cute they may seem. (But who knows what they transform into on later stages?)

Same probably goes for some brightly colored berries that we saw on this trail, though I’m not sure what they are.

plants with berries 0003 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

But luckily there were some delicious blueberries too!

plants with berries 0004 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

By mid-August, blubbery season is usually over in my local Harriman Park, but here in Vermont they seem to ripen later. So it was good to get some extra for the summer.

mushrooms 0001 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

There was an abundance of mushrooms of all kinds as well,

mushrooms 0002 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

some of them might be poisonous,

mushrooms 0004 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

others edible.

mushrooms 0003 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

I use an app from Audubon society to detect mushrooms, and boletes, like this two-colored one

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or white suillus, are easy to distinguish.

mushrooms 0005 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

A few of the local bolete species turn blue when bruised, especially noticeable against the yellow pores.

mushrooms 0006 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

But in this case, the bright color is not a warning sign – just a result of the oxidation of pulvinic acid derivatives, none of which is poisonous. So, on the way back we collected enough mushrooms for a delicious soup!

mushrooms 0007 Appalachian trail, Vermont, USA

But even without all these wild gourmet treats, the trails of Vermont are calling us, we’ll surely be back!

Kepulauan Raja Ampat di Papua Wilayah Indonesia: Surga di Atas dan Dalam Air

English

naturist 0002 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Siapa yang tidak suka melewatkan seminggu penuh di kepulauan tropis yang serba hijau dan dikelilingi oleh perairan yang jernih? Menulis ini membuat saya ingin kembali ke 7 hari yang sangat menyenangkan dalam perjalanan berlayar di salah satu keajaiban bahari alami di planet kita.

clown fish coral reef 0001 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Tulisan ini datang dari taman bahari Raja Ampat yang begitu mengagumkan di Papua.

islands view 0011 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Raja Ampat adalah kepulauan di ujung utara Semenanjung Kepala Burung di Pulau New Guinea, atau Papua, sebutan lainnya dalam Bahasa Indonesia. Daerah ini termasuk ke dalam wilayah Indonesia dan merupakan salah satu provinsi paling timur dari rangkaian kepulauan Indonesia yang luas. Raja Ampat adalah sebutan untuk empat raja yang ditunjuk oleh Kesultanan Tidore – sebuah kerajaan besar yang berpusat di Kepulauan Maluku – untuk memimpin empat pulau terbesar di kepulauan tersebut: Waigeo, Batanta, Salawati, dan Misool. Keempat raja yang berkuasa di pulau-pulau inilah yang melahirkan nama Raja Ampat.

Kami melewatkan seminggu penuh di Raja Ampat. Terdiri dari 6 orang, kami berlayar dengan kapal kayu untuk menjelajahi kepulauan yang indah ini. Ini adalah cara terbaik untuk berkeliling Raja Ampat – mengingat Raja Ampat merupakan kepulauan yang luas, sebaiknya Anda melewatkan hari-hari Anda di dalam air dan juga di permukaan air untuk mendapatkan pengalaman Raja Ampat yang terbaik.

Raja Ampat digadang-gadang sebagai alam bahari dengan keberagaman kehidupan bawah laut terkaya di dunia.

clown fish coral reef 0000 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Begitu saya tiba di kepulauan tersebut, saya tidak henti-hentinya mengagumi alam sekitar yang begitu indah – pemandangan dan perairannya yang luar biasa begitu mengagumkan.

naturist 0001 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Banyak orang setempat yang mengklaim kepulauan ini sebagai surga yang jatuh ke bumi, dan saya sangat setuju dengan pernyataan tersebut!

islands view 0004 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Kami memulai perjalanan dari bagian tengah kepulauan.

islands view 0003 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Kami disuguhi jajaran koral yang mengagumkan sejak hari pertama.

coral reef 0008 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Koral-koral tersebut begitu indah dan dalam keadaan yang baik

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– mendorong untuk melihat masa di mana banyak terumbu karang yang pudar akibat polusi.

coral reef 0000 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Ikan-ikannya pun tidak kalah cantik berwarna-warni, seolah-olah mereka berlomba untuk memenangkan busana terbaik.

coral reef 0002 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Cukup hanya dengan snorkeling, Anda bisa melihat hal-hal terbaik yang ditawarkan Raja Ampat.

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Ya, Anda hanya perlu perlengkapan seadanya untuk menikmati dunia bawah air yang luar biasa!

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Hari-hari berikutnya kami lalui dengan berlayar ke arah utara untuk mencapai

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Wayag –

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sekumpulan pulau-pulau kecil yang ditumbuhi hutan lebat yang sering muncul di internet bila Anda mencari Raja Ampat. Sebuah contoh klasik dari sebuah surga tropis.

islands view 0006 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Berenang, snorkeling, berjemur, memancing, adalah beberapa aktivitas yang bisa Anda nikmati selama berlayar. Di Raja Ampat Anda bahkan bisa berenang dan memberi makan hiu-hiu secara langsung!

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Mereka memang tidak sebesar itu, tapi pada awalnya memang cukup mengerikan dan membuat gugup. Namun tidak berapa lama berselang, saya sudah bergabung di antara kawanan hiu dan ikan-ikan kecil lainnya, yang mana cukup mengesankan.

Ada beberapa penginapan yang tersedia di beberapa pulau besar, dan beberapa darinya menawarkan paket-paket lengkap yang memungkinkan Anda melakukan banyak aktivitas. Tapi menurut saya, berlayar dengan kapal adalah cara terbaik untuk menikmati Raja Ampat, karena dengan begitu kita bisa pergi ke tempat yang terjauh yang kita mau.

islands view 0012 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Selain itu kita bisa rehat sejenak dari segala aktivitas air dan berkeliling pulau – bahkan hiking telanjang di hutan tropis!

islands view 0008 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Sementara teman-teman saya yang lain tidak tertarik untuk menanggalkan pakaian mereka, saya berhasil menyempatkan diri untuk memisahkan diri dan mempraktikkan naturisme. Saya harus akui bahwa saya termasuk pendatang baru dalam naturisme, di mana hal ini membuat saya sungkan untuk bertelanjang di sepanjang perjalanan. Namun saya tetap mempunyai kesempatan untuk melakukannya dengan senang. Saya masih bisa merasakan nikmatnya telanjang di alam dan merasakan hembusan angin tropis menyapu kulit.

naturist 0010 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Cuacanya memang sangat panas, namun tetap menyenangkan untuk dinikmati. Seperti kata banyak orang, matahari adalah perawatan yang terbaik.

naturist 0004 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Bagian terbaiknya? Tentu saja bisa berenang telanjang dan snorkeling di salah satu dunia bawah laut terbaik di dunia!

naturist 0009 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Bila Anda tertarik untuk melewatkan beberapa hari terbaik Anda di surga, saya sangat merekomendasikan Anda untuk berkunjung ke Raja Ampat. Otoritas setempat membatasi jumlah turis yang berkunjung ke Raja Ampat, yang mana merupakan hal yang bagus, karena dengan demikian pengunjung akan lebih sedikit dan kesempatan Anda untuk menikmati kepulauan untuk Anda sendiri semakin besar, terlebih lagi, sekali lagi, bila Anda melakukannya dengan cara berlayar. Kru kapal mungkin tidak terlalu kenal dengan naturisme jika Anda ingin membuat trip Anda sebuah pelayaran telanjang sepenuhnya. Namun, dengan memberikan pemahaman kepada mereka, saya yakin mereka akan paham dan memakluminya.

 

text and imagery by Miko

the legendary Ledges of Vermont

naturist 0001 Ledges at Harriman Reservoir, Vermont, USA

They might be legendary only in a relatively narrow circle among those who like nude recreation, but the Ledges in Vermont was one of the first naturist locations I heard of in the US, and this place is certainly worth the hype.  The Ledges represent flat rocks situated on the Eastern shore of the Harriman Reservoir.

naturist 0000 Ledges at Harriman Reservoir, Vermont, USA

The lake is mostly surrounded by forest, so the shores are green, and the water is very clean (the bottom is dark though, so it makes the water look dark too). So the Ledges give an impression of a pristine place, despite being very popular and quite crowded on weekends – the parking lot was full, and quite a few people arrived by boats.

naturist 0001 Ledges at Harriman Reservoir, Vermont, USA

The name of Harriman is already associated with naturist activities for me, because of numerous naked hikes that we’ve done in Harriman State Park in New York, but this place is recognized as clothing-optional officially!

naturist 0005 Ledges at Harriman Reservoir, Vermont, USA

We spent a great August day there – swimming, sunbathing, chatting – so when the time came to leave, it was hard to do so

naturist 0003 Ledges at Harriman Reservoir, Vermont, USA

to the extent that some of us felt glued to the place…

expedición en uno de los lugares con mayor biodiversidad en el mundo – Corcovado, Costa Rica

English

view 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

En la entrada anterior del blog sobre Costa Rica, te tentamos con una muestra de nuestro informe naturalista, así que aquí está: ¡tuvimos una notable expedición en uno de los lugares con mayor biodiversidad en el mundo! Y bien, como ya imaginaste – la mayor parte de esta caminata fue hecha por mí (y en menor medida por mis amigos)- una vez más mezclamos naturismo con gran interés en la historia natural.

Costa Rica es uno de los destinos favoritos para los entusiastas de la naturaleza, con el mayor porcentaje de área protegida en el mundo; aún para los estándares de Costa Rica, El Parque Nacional Corcovado en la Península de Osa es muy especial. Simplemente no hay muchos lugares en el mundo donde la selva tropical se reúne el mar, y este parque conserva  la mayor bosque primario en la costa del Pacífico de América.

Para bien o para mal, visitar este parque está altamente regulado, por ejemplo, se prohíbe visitar sin un guía certificado. Lo bueno es que el número de turistas se mantiene en niveles bajos, por lo que no hay riesgo de uso excesivo, pero esto hace que sea costoso y depende de encontrar un guía. En nuestro caso, este guía también tenía que estar de acuerdo con la idea del “senderismo libre”, es decir, senderismo sin ropa. Tuvimos la suerte de encontrar uno (a través de CouchSurfing) – alguien libre de prejuicios y que está bien informado de la biodiversidad local. Si quieres tener una aventura similar, te recomendamos a Elias (puedes ponerte en contacto con él a través de WhatsApp +50683811556).

Gracias a nuestro guía pudimos disfrutar de este increíble hábitat natural en el atuendo más natural,

naturist 0000 Corcovado, Costa Rica

y a la vez también pudimos ver un montón de vida silvestre que de otro modo sería casi imposible de detectar – como esta serpiente Dendrophidion.

Dendrophidion snake 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Los “labios calientes” de la planta elata Psychotria eran mucho más fácil de ver, y a la vez parecían un saludo agradable en el inicio del sendero de Los Patos a la estación Sirena.

Psychotria elata – hot lips plant 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

El bosque estaba dominado por árboles masivos,

tree 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

pero durante la primera hora o así, también había vegetación densa alrededor del sendero.

naturist 0001 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Hay que tener cuidado de no tocar los troncos y las ramas de los árboles sin mirarlos, ya que pueden estar cubiertos de espinas.

spiny tree 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

¡Y algunos se ven perversos!

spiny tree 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

El primer pájaro en el sendero fue una  pava moñuda (Penelope purpurascens) (en realidad 3 de ellos).

crested guan 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Nuestro guía no parecía muy contentos de verlos, ya que deben ser muy comunes, pero para mí incluso este pariente del pavo parecía un buen comienzo para la observación de aves (y la pava moñuda es bastante diferente de los pavos que vemos en América del Norte).

crested guan 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

La primera sección del sendero después de Los Patos es bastante montañosa, así que ciertamente me alegro de caminar sin ropa, ya que te sientes sudoroso fácilmente en esas condiciones (y supongo que aún más cuando vas allí después de 3-4 meses de invierno del norte, ya que hicimos este viaje a finales de marzo del año pasado).

naturist 0002 Corcovado, Costa Rica

El siguiente animal que vimos fue una serpiente loro verde trepando por un árbol (esta fue mi primera vez viendo a serpiente de árbol).

Leptophis ahaetulla – green parrot snake 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

No seríamos capaces de detectar ll movimiento de la enredadera al menos que usemos cámaras durante mucho tiempo, pero era interesante ver cómo era capaz de subir el tronco verticalmente, con un tipo de hojas unidas al tronco.

tree 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Esta lagartija parecía estar bien curiosa de nuestra presencia,

tree lizard 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

y parecía estar dispuesta a modelar para la cámara mientras subía por el árbol.

tree lizard 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Mientras tanto, otro tipo de lagartija parecía ser mucho más tímida y prefirió esconderse en las hojas en el suelo.

lizard 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Entonces vimos un montón de animales de un tipo específico que no sólo no están tratando de esconderse sino más bien limpian su camino de hojas muertas …

leaf-cutter ants 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Mientras llevan piezas de hojas recién cortadas hacia su colonia para cultivo de hongos.

leaf-cutter ants 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Fue interesante ver el trabajo de las hormigas cortadoras de hojas en diferentes etapas

leaf-cutter ants 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

(Aunque los últimos pasos de cultivo de hongos están bien escondidos bajo tierra).

Probablemente había muchos más insectos que pasaron desapercibidos, ya que la mayoría de ellos están bien camuflados

grasshopper 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

… a menos que tengan los ojos ​​excepcionalmente rosados, como este saltamontes!

grasshopper 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Este escarabajo brillante no se molestó en esconderse, pero estaba bien blindado, como si estuviera hecho de metal.

beetle 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Después de tres horas de caminata, cruzamos el primer arroyo. Era superficial, pero el agua era clara y refrescante. Estaba lleno de peces pequeños (también bien camuflados).

fish in the stream 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Después de caminar en el denso bosque, era agradable estar en un espacio más abierto,

y más agradable aún – encontrar un arroyo para refrescarse (desnudos, obviamente).

naturist 0004 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Aquí vimos otra lagartija, un basilisco, pero sólo vimos ejemplares jóvenes (no se comparaban con la iguana en el hotel Villa Roca).

basilisc lizard 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Uno de ellos estaba en la búsqueda de libélulas,

basilisc lizard and dragonfly 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

aunque no con mucho éxito.

basilisc lizard 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

No muy lejos del riachuelo, vimos un momoto de corona azul (similar a la que vi por los cenotes en Yucatán).

Blue-crowned Motmot 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

De vuelta en el bosque, nos quedamos impresionados de nuevo por los árboles y sus raíces. Esas raíces entrelazadas pueden crear nichos acogedores para otras plantas

palm tree in ficus 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

o cualquier otro organismo dispuesto a ocuparlos.

naturist 0021 Corcovado, Costa Rica

¡Algunas de esas raíces eran verdaderamente masivas!

naturist 0006 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Vale la pena señalar que en gran medida las raíces no serían capaces de funcionar sin la simbiosis con hongos, que hacen mucho trabajo invisible en el bosque. Sólo los notamos cuando producen cuerpos fructíferos para la reproducción sexual, como este hongo púrpura.

purple mushroom 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

En otro lugar, el suelo estaba cubierto de flores moradas.

view 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Esto nos hizo darnos cuenta de cuánto estábamos perdiendo por no ser capaces de ver el bosque desde la cima. Muchos de esos árboles debían estar floreciendo, pero la única forma de ver las flores era cuando caían al suelo.

Además de los árboles, las lianas constituyen una parte importante de la vida vegetal en el bosque tropical,

liana 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y vimos lianas realmente masivas en Corcovado, tan gruesas como árboles. Y algunos tuvieron que tomar formas peculiares en su camino hacia arriba (¿un giro en U?)

liana 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Muchas lianas se entrelazan y retuercen sus tallos, y éste en la foto de abajo me recordó la doble hélice del ADN.

liana 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

A veces era incluso difícil distinguir los límites entre árboles vecinos, o dónde terminaban sus raíces y comenzaban las lianas, como si estuvieran todas interconectadas.

tree 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y por supuesto había un montón animales viven en los árboles y se les gusta este tipo de lío.

squirrel monkey 0005 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

A medida que nos cruzamos con un gran grupo de monos ardilla, fue increíble y divertido ver cómo se movían fácilmente saltando entre todas esas ramas y lianas (en la foto de arriba se puede ver cómo utilizan la cola para equilibrar).

squirrel monkey 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y eran igualmente buenos usando esas ramas para descansar  =)

squirrel monkey 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Era difícil decir quién estaba más curioso: ¿los monos de nosotros, o nosotros de ellos?

squirrel monkey 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

(Aquí se puede ver cómo utilizan la cola como una quinta extremidad.)

Aunque no todos parecían divertidos por el mono desnudo en el suelo …

squirrel monkey 0004 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Mientras estábamos observando a nuestros familiares peludos con cola y de rápido movimiento, Elías notó otra criatura en los árboles – ¡un oso perezoso!

sloth 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Estaba durmiendo (¡por supuesto!) A pesar de toda la locomoción alrededor.

Los monos no tenían prisa por alejarse, y podríamos haber pasado mucho más tiempo mirando el uno al otro, pero tuvimos que continuar nuestra caminata.

squirrel monkey 0006 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Para entonces, el bosque se volvió mucho más seco (según los estándares de selva tropical) y más plano.

liana 0004 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Pasamos a través de una arboleda de bambúes que eran muy altos pero mucho más delgados que las especies típicas, pero estaban todos entrelazados y, por tanto, se apoyaban entre sí.

view 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Para entonces ya habíamos visto y oído un montón de loros, todos estaban a la distancia; así que cuando nos encontramos con una guacamaya escarlata que se alimentaba tranquilamente a simple vista, ¡fue una vista hermosa y rara!

Scarlet Macaw 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

La próxima oportunidad de observación de aves se presentó poco después y fue igualmente emocionante, aunque el pájaro no era tan brillante excepto por su cara roja. Estaba muy entusiasmado con algo también, ya que anunció su presencia con unos gritos agudos (¿era una advertencia para nosotros?)

Mountain caracara 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Era un ave de rapiña, un tipo de caracara, pero no puedo decir la especie exacta. Parece más similar al caracara andino, pero esta especie no se ve en la Península de Osa … ¿algún especialista entre los lectores aquí?

La tarde estaba muy caliente, así que cuando cruzamos otro río, nos pareció muy oportuno.

view 0004 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Como el sol se estaba poniendo, tuvimos que continuar al campamento en la estación biológica de Sirena, pero ya estábamos cerca. ¡Fue entonces cuando me di cuenta de que perdí mis pantalones cortos cuando dejé el bolsillo abierto en la mochila! Por desgracia, el camping no es de ropa opcional … pero afortunadamente uno de mis amigos tenía un par de calzoncillos de repuesto que parecía pantaloncillos de bicicleta.

Al acercarnos a Sirena, pasamos por una arboleda de palmeras frutales con hojas gigantes.

palm tree 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

El último animal que vimos en el sendero ese día fue un tranquilo pájaro martineta (tinamúe).

tinamu 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Pero eso no fue todo por ese día. ¡Mientras estábamos instalando la tienda en el campamento, un tapir se aventuró a la luz!

tapir 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Me sorprendió – este era el animal más grande que había visto en la naturaleza.

tapir 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Pero el tapir no podía importarle menos, sólo pasaba la pradera sin mucha prisa antes de desaparecer nuevamente en el bosque.

tapir 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

A medida que se oscurecía, nos fuimos a la cafetería para cenar, donde tuve que explicar que mis boxers eran shorts – ya sabes, todavía quieren mantener un poco de estilo para cenas incluso en medio de la selva. 😀

Por la noche estábamos disfrutando de nuestro sueño a pesar de los sonidos de monos aulladores (¡que pensé primero eran jaguares!) y una tormenta. Por la mañana, todo estaba en calma de nuevo. Después del desayuno, nos aventuramos a continuar nuestra caminata.

view 0005 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Casi inmediatamente después de la estación, el camino llega a la playa y continua a lo largo de la costa, pero como ya he dicho, este es un lugar donde la playa y el bosque se encuentran – por lo que aquí se puede disfrutar de los dos. La arena es predominantemente de origen volcánico negro, aunque no tan negro puro como en Kehena en Hawai.

tree with yellow and red flowers 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Había un árbol con las flores que eran amarillas o rojas, que parecían muy inusuales.

tree with yellow and red flowers 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Una posibilidad es que el color cambia a medida que las flores maduran, porque las más frescas tienden a ser amarillas. ¿Alguna otra idea?

tree with yellow and red flowers 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Tuvimos que cruzar bastantes bocas de río, pero todos eran bastante superficiales. Creo que esto puede cambiar bastante dependiendo de la lluvia y la marea.

view 0006 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Esto explicó por qué había tantos pájaros en la playa que son más típicos para los cuerpos de agua dulce,

bittern 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

tales como estas garzas.

bittern 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

En la playa, los cocoteros eran a menudo la especie predominante; pasamos por unos cuantos bosques de esas palmeras.

naturist 0007 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Y las condiciones parecían ser buenas para que los cocos germinaran allí. También encontramos un coco que estaba lleno de zumo, y nuestro guía lo abrió para nosotros usando rocas y un cuchillo regular. Fue un refresco perfecto.

coconut sapling 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Pero aquí y allá el sendero iría más profundo en el bosque, con sus árboles gigantes y sus intrincados sistemas de raíces.

naturist 0009 Corcovado, Costa Rica

No te sorprendas si ves algo como esta araña de seda de oro sobre su tela entre esas raíces.

golden orb-weaver spider 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Aunque si tienes suerte, puedes ver algo más bonito. Generalmente no se ven muchas orquídeas en el bosque, porque la mayoría de ellas crecen más arriba en los árboles.

orchid 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Pero aquí en el borde del bosque, incluso las orquídeas epífitas pueden crecer más cerca del suelo, donde hay más luz disponible.

orchid 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Debe haber mucha competencia entre las plantas en este denso hábitat que no nos damos cuenta, a menos que sea algo más obvio, como esta higuera estranguladora que se apodera de otro árbol.

strangler fig 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Estas sorprendentes lianas me permitieron quedarme suspendido en el aire, y dejé que mi Tarzán interior saliera un rato =)

naturist 0010 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Este sendero nunca se alejó mucho de la costa, así que había una brisa refrescante.

view 0007 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y en la playa, había bastante sombra en la primera mitad del día.

naturist 0012 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Así que en general, esta sección de nuestra caminata fue mucho más relajada; sólo de vez en cuando necesitábamos pasar por encima o alrededor de las rocas.

view 0009 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

A pesar de que es una selva, hay algunos árboles aquí que se adaptan para los períodos sin mucha lluvia acumulando agua en el interior de sus gruesos troncos. Estos son ceibas, y pueden llegar a ser muy altos también.

naturist 0013 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Y si golpeas sus troncos, puedes escuchar una resonancia debido a su naturaleza hueca.

Las ceibas tienen hermosas flores, pero sólo encontramos restos de sus estambres.

fallen flower 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y había más árboles con impresionantes raíces de apoyo.

tree 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Cuando se acercaba el mediodía, el sol se estaba ponía muy fuerte, y había menos sombra.

naturist 0015 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Pero encontramos un buen lugar para tomar un descanso, un chapuzón en el océano y revolcarnos en la cálida arena …

naturist 0016 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Y para subirse en un árbol también.

naturist 0017 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Luego el tiempo cambió rápidamente, y temimos que nos encontraríamos en medio de una tormenta, pero nunca llegó a ser más fuerte que una llovizna.

view 0010 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Hasta el momento, ese día no era muy rico en avistamientos de animales, sólo podíamos esperar ver algo en el océano – Costa Rica es un destino conocido de observación de ballenas, pero no había nada que ver en el agua desde la costa … ¡Pero Elías señaló que había una ballena en la playa misma!

Bueno, era una ballena muerta …

naturist 0019 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Estaba bien muerta, pero es lo más parecido que he llegado a tocar una ballena. Y sólo podemos adivinar cómo llegó hasta aquí.

En el mismo lugar, vimos una familia de curiosos monos araña.

spider monkey 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Estos monos debían estar preguntándose cómo perdimos nuestro pelaje 😀

naturist 0018 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Pero sería justo decir, sentí como si estuvieran reconociendo algún parecido familiar. Más tarde, vimos un grupo mucho más grande de monos, pero demasiado alto en los árboles como para tomar fotos. Sin embargo, también se interesaron en nosotros, y estaban arrojándonos frutas (y no parecía que lo hicieran de manera agresiva). Esto me recordó una historia reciente de una niña que fue perdida / abandonada en la selva pero sobrevivió al menos parcialmente gracias a la comida que los monos compartieron con ella. Por desgracia, los mangos que nos ofrecieron los monos a nosotros no estaban maduraos excepto por uno que era apenas comestible.

Nuestro siguiente encuentro no fue tan sociable, pero yo estaba muy contento de poder verlo – un oso hormiguero. Era un tamandua septentrional, que no es una especie rara, pero todavía muy evasiva, especialmente durante el día.

anteater northern tamandua 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y es un ágil escalador de árboles, utilizando su cola como una extremidad adicional.

anteater northern tamandua 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

También vimos dos halcones negros comunes.

mangrove black hawk 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Uno de ellos estaba disfrutando de una comida.

mangrove black hawk 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Vimos un montón guacamayas escarlata volando, fue una hermosa vista, pero pasaron demasiado rápido como para tomar fotos.

Luego pasamos a través de un bosque de plátanos, al que probablemente no hubiéramos prestado mucha atención, aunque sólo fuera para comprobar si había alguna fruta para merendar (y no había maduras). Pero nuestro guía nos llamó a mirar debajo una de las hojas. ¡Y había un grupo de murciélagos! Sin embargo, sólo uno de ellos se quedó para las fotos.

tent-making bat 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Estos murciélagos son conocidos porque hacen “tiendas de campaña”, se alojan debajo de las hojas grandes mordiendo la sección central de modo que se pliega como formando el techo de una tienda de campaña.

tent-making bat 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y como son frugívoros, los plátanos pueden proveer alimento y refugio.

Por cierto, aunque la mayor parte del Parque Nacional Corcovado es un bosque primario, algunas secciones en la orilla, donde pasa este sendero, pasan por antiguas plantaciones. Ya he mencionado mangos y plátanos, estas no son especies nativas de allí. Y aunque Costa Rica es el mayor productor de piña, esta tampoco es una fruta nativa.

wild pineapple flower 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Supongo que esta es una planta de piña en flor, pero podría ser otro tipo de bromelíaceas.

El último animal que vimos por el sendero antes de llegar a la estación de guardaparques La Leona fue un coatí (conocido en Costa Rica como pizote).

coati 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Estos parientes de mapaches están entre los mamíferos más ubicuos del Corcovado, y por lo general viven en grupos, por lo que fue irónico que vimos sólo uno y al final de nuestra caminata, después de haber visto un montón de animales más exóticos.

Después de un poco de descanso en la estación de guardabosques (ya vestidos), continuamos caminando en la playa hacia el asentamiento más cercano – Carate. Allí, tuvimos una buena cena y una ducha, y luego acampamos en la playa (desnudos de nuevo).

view 0011 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Era una noche oscura, cálida, pero con brisa, y el acampar en la arena era cómodo – todo prometió una buena noche de sueño. Pero no nos dimos cuenta de que había numerosos cangrejos esperando a salir de sus agujeros por la noche. Y algunos de ellos pasaron a estar bajo nuestra tienda. Así que, si acampas en una playa así, trata de encontrar un lugar sin agujeros.

Al día siguiente, planeamos explorar el bosque a lo largo del Río Nuevo, pero el coche que se suponía que nos recogería no llegó, y no había servicio de telefonía móvil … Entonces alguien vino a hacernos saber que el coche tuvo un desperfecto cuando venía de camino, así que tuvimos que coger un autobús a Puerto Jiménez.

Elías entonces organizó otra excursión para nosotros en la tarde. Ya no estaba dentro del parque, en realidad fue al lado de un pastizal de vacas, pero la perspectiva de nadar desnudos en el río sonaba bien.

naturist + monstera 0020 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Encontré una planta de monstera con frutos, poco antes del viaje había probado esta fruta por primera vez me encantó (y era muy caro en un supermercado de Nueva York), estaba ansioso por probar esta fruta en la naturaleza. ¡Incluso su nombre científico es Monstera deliciosa!

monstera 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Pero lamentablemente no estaba completamente madura, y todavía tenía algunas escalas irritantes. 😦

Cuando caminaba por el río, volví a ver un basilisco.

basilisc lizard 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y esta vez, finalmente vi con mis propios ojos, por qué también se llama la lagartija Jesús – ¡puede caminar sobre el agua! Bueno, no realmente caminar, sino correr –

basilisc lizard 0004 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Y tan rápido, que apenas se puede capturar con la fotografía (a menos que estés bien preparado para ello).

También vi un par de tortugas en el río. Pero en un agujero en la orilla del río, había otro reptil icónico del trópico americano

boa constrictor 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

– una boa constrictor. A diferencia de la lagartija, no lo vi en acción. Realmente noté unas cuantas garrapatas unidas a ella – así que en vez de una boa constrictor que succionaba la vida de su presa, vi a esos pequeños arácnidos chupándole su sangre.

boa constrictor 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

¡Es increíble la cantidad de fauna que vimos en diferentes formas en esos 3 días en el Parque Nacional Corcovado y sus alrededores!

Si eres un entusiasta de la naturaleza, sin duda es un destino de primera. Esperamos que también puedas encontrar un buen guía. Y en caso de que también pierdas tu pantalones cortos, puedes encontrar el mío en algún lugar en el camino. 😉

Traducción por Ivan

our theme camp Gymnasium will be at 7:30 Plaza at Burning Man

Our participation in Burning Man 2017 has been approved, and our theme camp Gymnasium will be at 7:30 Plaza. Oh well, it’s not the 7:30 Portal where we were in 2015, but 7:30 is apparently the most requested sector of the Black Rock City, and plazas get a lot of traffic – so we are expecting a lot of visitors participants in our events! We will announce the schedule in a month or so, stay tuned!

We are always open to new campmates too, so if you would like to participate, please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

skinny-dipping in the Adirondacks

naturist 0001 Potholers, Adirondacks, New York, USA

The Adirondacks are great for hiking and kayaking, but even relaxing by a creek may turn out very special there, as it happened to us at the so-called Potholers on the East Canada Creek. One of the reasons was that it was secluded enough to have the spot to ourselves most of the time, so we stayed comfortably naked.

naturist 0000 Potholers, Adirondacks, New York, USA

Upstream from where we stayed, the creek was deep enough for swimming.

naturist 0010 Potholers, Adirondacks, New York, USA

Downstream were the rocks, flat and comfortable – you can’t ask for a better way of relaxation than chilling outdoors with the sound of running water.

naturist 0011 Potholers, Adirondacks, New York, USA

Well, maybe if you get in that running water for a shoulder massage!

naturist 0004 Potholers, Adirondacks, New York, USA

Some of the “potholes” create perfect natural bathtubs, where you could sit with the water flowing over your shoulders and massaging you! And the temperature of the water was (in July) just perfect – refreshing but not chilling.

naturist 0007 Potholers, Adirondacks, New York, USA

It was also nice to go behind that water wall and close yourself from the outer world for a moment.

naturist 0003 Potholers, Adirondacks, New York, USA

Of course you could still see through, even though quite distorted. But there were some very peculiar things to observe indeed!

Check out this video:

We are pretty sure this behavior has never been seen (or at least recorded) before, and we still don’t know its meaning. What is it?

Maybe that is what happens when naturists become naturalists and artists at the some time 🙂

On that trip, we also visited the G-lake. It was great for swimming, but while bushwalking around it, one of us got stung by wild bees!

naturist view 0000 G Lake, Adirondacks, New York, USA

And not to make you completely against the idea of visiting this lake, we also saw a leech there. But it was actually a pretty sight, because it swam gracefully at the surface and was brightly colored – green with orange spots; so I actually regretted I didn’t have my camera at that moment. Well, but at least we were lucky to record the elusive Homo tritonii at the Potholers!

trekking through a biodiversity hotspot in Costa Rica

español

view 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

In the previous blogpost from Costa Rica, we teased you with a prospect of a naturalist report, so here it is: we had quite a remarkable expedition in one the most biodiverse locations in the world! And well, you guessed it – most of this trek was done by me (and to a less extent by my friends) in the buff – so once again, we were mixing naturism with big interest in natural history.

Costa Rica is a favorite for nature enthusiasts, with the highest percentage of protected land in the world; but even by Costa Rican standards, Corcovado National Park on the Osa Peninsula is very special. There are simply not many places left in the world where tropical rainforest meets the sea, and this park conserves the largest primary forest on the American Pacific coastline. For better or worse, visiting this park is highly regulated, e.g., it is forbidden to visit without a certified guide. The good thing is that the number of tourists is maintained at low levels, so there is no risk of overuse, but this makes it expensive and dependent on finding a guide. In our case, this guide also had to be OK with the idea of free-hiking, i.e. hiking without clothes. We were lucky to find one (through CouchSurfing) – both open-minded and knowledgeable about local wildlife. If you want to have a similar adventure, we highly recommend Elias (you can contact him via WhatsApp +50683811556).

So, we could enjoy this amazing natural habitat in the most natural attire,

naturist 0000 Corcovado, Costa Rica

but thanks to our guide we could also see a lot of wildlife that would otherwise be nearly impossible to spot – like this Dendrophidion snake.

Dendrophidion snake 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

‘Hot lips’ of Psychotria elata plant were much easier to notice, and they seemed like a nice greeting in the beginning of the trail from Los Patos to Sirena station.

Psychotria elata – hot lips plant 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

The forest was dominated by massive trees,

tree 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

but during the first hour or so, there was also dense vegetation around the trail.

naturist 0001 Corcovado, Costa Rica

One has to be careful not to touch tree trunks and branches without looking at them, as they may be covered in spines,

spiny tree 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

and some look just vicious!

spiny tree 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

The first bird on the trail was crested guan (actually 3 of them).

crested guan 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Our guide didn’t seem too excited to see them, as they must be very common, but to me even this relative of turkey seemed like a good start for birdwatching (and guan is quite different from the turkeys we see in North America).

crested guan 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

The first section of the trail after Los Patos is quite hilly, so I was certainly glad to walk without clothes, as you get sweaty easily in those conditions (and I guess even more so when you go there after 3-4 months of the northern winter, as we did this trip in the end of March last year).

naturist 0002 Corcovado, Costa Rica

The next animal we spotted was a green parrot snake creeping up the tree (this was my first tree snake).

Leptophis ahaetulla – green parrot snake 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

This plant creeper’s movement we wouldn’t be able to detect unless we used cameras over long time, but it was interesting to see how it was able to climb up the trunk vertically, with one type of the leaves attached to the trunk.

tree 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

This lizard seemed to be quiet curious about us,

tree lizard 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

and it was posing well for the camera while climbing up the tree.

tree lizard 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Meanwhile, another kind of lizard seemed to be a lot more timid and preferred to hide in the leaves on the ground.

lizard 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Then we saw plenty of animals of a specific kind that are not only not trying to hide but actually clear their path from dead leaves…

leaf-cutter ants 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

while carrying freshly cut leaf pieces towards their colony for mushroom farming.

leaf-cutter ants 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

It was interesting to see the work of leaf-cutter ants at different stages

leaf-cutter ants 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

(though the final steps of mushroom farming are well hidden under ground).

There were probably many more insects that remained unnoticed, as most of them are well camouflaged

grasshopper 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

… unless they have outstanding pink eyes, like this grasshopper!

grasshopper 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

This shiny beetle didn’t bother to hide, but then it was quite well armored, as if made of metal.

beetle 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

After three hours of hiking, we crossed the first stream. It was shallow, but the water was clear and refreshing. It was full of small fish (also well camouflaged).

fish in the stream 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

After walking in the dense forest, it was nice to be in a more open space,

and even nicer – to cool off in the stream (skinny-dipping, obviously).

naturist 0004 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Here we saw another lizard, the iconic basilisk, but only young individuals (nothing like the dragon at the Villa Roca hotel).

basilisc lizard 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

One of them was on the hunt for dragonflies,

basilisc lizard and dragonfly 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

though not very successfully.

basilisc lizard 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Not too far from the stream, we saw a blue-crowned motmot (similar to the one I saw by the cenotes in Yucatan).

Blue-crowned Motmot 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Back in the forest, we were impressed again by the trees and their roots. Those intertwining roots may create cozy niches for other plants

palm tree in ficus 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

or anyone else willing to occupy them.

naturist 0021 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Some of those supporting, buttress roots were truly massive!

naturist 0006 Corcovado, Costa Rica

It’s worth noting, that to a large extent the roots wouldn’t be able to function without symbiosis with fungi, which do a lot of invisible job in the forest. We only notice them when they produce fruiting bodies for sexual reproduction, such as this purple mushroom.

purple mushroom 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

At another spot, the ground was covered in purple flowers.

view 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

This made us realize how much we were missing out by not being able to see the forest from the top. Quite a few of those trees must have been blooming, but the only way to see the flowers was when they would fall on the ground.

Besides the trees, lianas constitute a large and important part of plant life in the tropical forest,

liana 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

and we saw really massive lianas in Corcovado, as thick as trees. And some had to take peculiar forms on their way up (a U-turn?)

liana 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Many lianas interweave and twist their stems, and this one on the photo below reminded me the double helix of DNA.

liana 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Sometimes it was even hard to tell the border between neighboring trees, or where their roots ended and lianas began – as if they were all interconnected.

tree 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

And of course there were plenty of tree-dwelling animals that like this kind of mess.

squirrel monkey 0005 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

As we got across a big group of squirrel monkeys, it was amazing and amusing to see how easily they moved jumping between all those branches and lianas (on the photo above you can see how the tail is used for balancing).

squirrel monkey 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

And they were equally good at using those brunches lounging =)

squirrel monkey 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

It was hard to tell who was more curious: monkeys about us, or we about them?

squirrel monkey 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

(Here you can see how the tail is used as a fifth limb.)

Though not all of them seemed that amused by the naked ape on the ground…

squirrel monkey 0004 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

While we were goggling at our fast-moving tailed and furry relatives, Elias noticed another creature in the trees – a sloth!

sloth 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

It was sleeping (of course!) despite all the locomotion around.

The monkeys were in no rush to move away, and we could have spent much more time staring at each other, but we had to continue our trek.

squirrel monkey 0006 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

By that time, the forest became much drier (by rainforest standards), and flatter.

liana 0004 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

We passed through a grove of bamboos that were very tall but much thinner than typical species, but they were all intertwined and thus supported each other.

view 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Although by then we had seen and heard plenty of parrots, they were all in a distance; so when we encountered a scarlet macaw feeding calmly in plain view, it was a beautiful and rare sight!

Scarlet Macaw 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

The next birdwatching opportunity presented itself shortly after and was equally exciting, though the bird wasn’t as bright except for the red face. It was quite excited about something too, as it announced its presence by piercing screeches (was it a warning for us?)

Mountain caracara 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

It was a bird of prey, caracara, but I cannot tell the exact species. It looks most similar to mountain caracara, but this species is not known on the Osa peninsula… any specialists among the readers here?

The afternoon was quite hot, so when we crossed another river, it felt very timely.

view 0004 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

As the sun was setting, we had to continue to the campground at the Sirena biological station, but we were close already. That was when I realized I lost my shorts from the open pocket in the backpack! Unfortunately, the camp site is not clothing-optional here… but luckily one of my friends had a spare pair of briefs that looked like bicycle shorts.

At the approach to Sirena, we passed through a grove of fruiting pam trees with giant leaves.

palm tree 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

The last animal we saw on the trail that day was a quiet bird tinamou.

tinamu 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

But that wasn’t it for the day. As we were setting up the tent at the campground, a tapir ventured out in the open!

tapir 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

I was stunned – this was the largest animal I’d seen in the wild.

tapir 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

But the tapir himself couldn’t care less, was just passing the grassy area without much rush before disappearing in the forest again.

tapir 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

As it was getting dark, we went to the cafeteria for dinner, where I had to explain that my boxers were shorts – you know, they still want to keep some style for dinners even  in the middle of the jungle 😀

At night we were enjoying our sleep despite the sounds of howler monkeys (which I first thought were jaguars!) and a thunderstorm. By the morning, everything was calm again. After breakfast, we ventured out to continue our trek.

view 0005 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Almost immediately after the station, the trail comes to the beach and it goes along the shore, but as I mentioned, this is a place where the beach and the forest meet – so here you can enjoy them both. The sand is mostly volcanic black, though not as pure black as at Kehena in Hawaii.

tree with yellow and red flowers 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

There was a tree with flowers that were either yellow or red, which seemed very unusual.

tree with yellow and red flowers 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

One possibility is that the color changes as the flowers mature, because the fresher ones tended to be yellow. Any other ideas?

tree with yellow and red flowers 0002 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

We had to cross quite a few river mouths, but they were all pretty shallow. I believe this may change quite a lot depending on rain and tide.

view 0006 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

This explained why there were so many birds on the beach that are more typical for fresh water bodies,

bittern 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

such as these bitterns.

bittern 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

At the beach frontline, coconut palms were often the prevalent species; we passed through a few groves of those.

naturist 0007 Corcovado, Costa Rica

And the conditions seemed to be good for coconuts to germinate there. We also found a coconut that was full of juice, and our guide opened it for us using rocks and a regular knife. That a was perfect refreshment.

coconut sapling 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

But here and there the trail would go deeper in the forest, with its giant trees and their intricate root systems.

naturist 0009 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Don’t be surprised if you see something like this golden orb-weaver spider on the web between those roots.

golden orb-weaver spider 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Though if you are lucky, you may see something prettier. You don’t see many orchids in the forest, because most of them grow higher in the trees.

orchid 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

But here at the edge of the forest, even epiphyte orchids can grow closer to the ground, with more light available.

orchid 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

There must be a lot of competition between plants in this dense habitat which we don’t notice, unless it’s something more obvious like this menacing strangler fig getting a hold of another tree.

strangler fig 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

The amazingly intertwined lianas allowed me to stay suspended in the air, and I let my inner Tarzan out =)

naturist 0010 Corcovado, Costa Rica

But this trail never went too far from the shoreline, so there was a refreshing breeze.

view 0007 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

And on the beach, there was quite a lot of shade in the first half of the day.

naturist 0012 Corcovado, Costa Rica

So overall, this section of our trek went a lot more leisurely; just once in a while we’d need go over or around the rocks.

view 0009 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

Even though it’s a rainforest, there are some trees here that are adapted for periods without much rain by accumulating water in their thick trunks. These are ceibas, and they can get very tall too.

naturist 0013 Corcovado, Costa Rica

And if you smack their trunks, you can here a ringing resound because of their hollow nature.

Ceibas have beautiful flowers, but we only found their leftovers with stamens.

fallen flower 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

And there were more trees with impressive buttress roots.

tree 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

As we were approaching noontime, the sun was getting very strong, and there was less shade.

naturist 0015 Corcovado, Costa Rica

But we found a good spot to take a break, dip in the ocean and roll in the warm sand…

naturist 0016 Corcovado, Costa Rica

and climb a tree too.

naturist 0017 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Then the weather changed rapidly, and we were afraid to get in a rainstorm, but it never got stronger than some drizzle.

view 0010 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

So far, that day wasn’t very rich on animal sightings, we could only hope to see something in the ocean – Costa Rica is a known whale-watching destination after all, but there was nothing to be seen in the water from the shore… Then, Elias pointed at a whale on the shore itself!

Well, it was a dead one…

naturist 0019 Corcovado, Costa Rica

Very much dead indeed, but it’s as close as I’ve ever got to touching a whale. And we can only guess how it got this far in.

At the same spot, we saw a family of curious spider monkeys,

spider monkey 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

they might be wondering as to how we lost our fur 😀

naturist 0018 Corcovado, Costa Rica

But it’d be fair to say, I felt like they were recognizing some family resemblance. Later, we saw a much bigger group of monkeys, but too high up in the trees to take photos. However, they also got interested in us, and were throwing fruit to us (and it didn’t seem like it was done in an aggressive manner). This reminded me of a recent story of a girl that was lost/abandoned in the jungle but survived at least partially thanks to the food that monkeys shared with her. Unfortunately, the mangos that were offered by the monkeys to us were not ripe at all except for one that was only barely edible.

Our next encounter was not so sociable, but I was very glad to be able to see it – an anteater. It was a northern tamandua, which is not a rare species, but still very elusive, especially during day time.

anteater northern tamandua 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

And it is quite an agile tree climber, using its tail as an additional limb.

anteater northern tamandua 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

We also saw two common black hawks.

mangrove black hawk 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

One of them was enjoying a meal.

mangrove black hawk 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

We saw a plenty of flying scarlet macaws again, which was a beautiful sight, but they moved too fast for taking photos.

Then we passed through a banana grove,  to which we probably wouldn’t have paid much attention, if only to check if for any fruit to snack on (and there weren’t any ripe). But our guide called us to look under one of the leaves. And there was a group of bats! Only one of them stayed for the photos though.

tent-making bat 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

These are called tent-making bats, as they roost under big leaves which they bite in central section so that it folds as if roof of a tent.

tent-making bat 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

And since they a frugivores, bananas can provide both food and shelter.

By the way, although most of the Corcovado National Park is a primary forest, some sections on the shore, where this trail passes, go through former plantations. I’ve already mentioned mangos and bananas, and they are not native species there. And even though Costa Rica is the largest producer of pineapples, those are not native either.

wild pineapple flower 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

I assume this is a flowering pineapple plant, but it might be another bromeliad.

The last animal we saw by the trail before reaching La Leone ranger station was a coati.

coati 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

These relatives of raccoons are among the most ubiquitous mammals in Corcovado, and they usually live in groups, so it was ironic that we saw only one and by the end of our trek, after having seen plenty of more exotic animals.

After some rest at the ranger station (already clothed), we continued walking on the beach towards the nearest settlement – Carate. There, we had a nice dinner and a shower, and then camped on the beach (naked again).

view 0011 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

It was a pitch-black night, warm but with a breeze, and camping on sand was comfortable – all promised a good night sleep. But we didn’t realize that there were numerous crabs waiting to come out from their holes at night. And some of them happened to be under our tent. So if you camp on a beach like that, try to find a spot without any holes.

Next day, we planned to explore the forest along the river Rio Nuevo, but the car that was supposed to pick us up didn’t arrive, and there was no mobile phone service… Then someone came to let us know that the car broke on the way, so we had to take a bus to Puerto Jimenez.

Elias then organized another excursion for us in the afternoon. It was no longer within the park, actually next to cow pastures, but the prospect of skinny dipping in the river sounded good.

naturist + monstera 0020 Corcovado, Costa Rica

I found a fruiting monstera plant, and as I had tried this fruit for the first time just briefly before the trip and loved it (and it was very expensive at a NYC supermarket), I was eager to munch on this one in nature. Even its scientific name is Monstera deliciosa!

monstera 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

But unfortunately it wasn’t fully ripe, and it still had some irritating scales 😦

When I walked along the river, I saw a basilisk again.

basilisc lizard 0003 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

And this time, I finally saw with my own eyes, why it is also called a Jesus lizard – it can walk on water! Well, not really walk but rather run –

basilisc lizard 0004 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

and so fast, that you can hardly capture it with photography (unless you are well prepared for it).

I also saw a couple of tortoises in the river. But in a hole on the riverbank, there was another iconic reptile of the American tropics

boa constrictor 0000 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

– a boa constrictor. Unlike with the basilisk, I didn’t see it in action. I actually noticed a few ticks attached to it – so instead of a boa constrictor sucking life out of its prey, I saw those small arachnids sucking on its blood.

boa constrictor 0001 Corcovado, Osa peninsula, Costa Rica

So much wildlife in so many forms we saw in those 3 days in Corcovado National Park and its surroundings, it’s amazing! If you are a nature enthusiast, it is certainly a top destination. Hopefully, you’ll have a good guide too. And in case you lose your shorts, you may find mine somewhere on the trail 😉

Raja Ampat archipelago in the Indonesian Papua: paradise above and under water

bahasa Indonesia

naturist 0002 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Who wouldn’t like a full week spent at a tropical, green archipelago surrounded by pristine waters? Writing this makes me want to throw myself back to those worry-free 7 days (almost a year ago) of a sailing trip at one of the natural marine wonders of our planet.

clown fish coral reef 0001 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

This post comes all the way from the magnificent marine park of Raja Ampat in Papua.

islands view 0011 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Raja Ampat is an archipelago on the northern tip of the Bird’s Peninsula on the island of New Guinea or Papua, as it’s locally called. It belongs to Indonesian territory and is one of the easternmost provinces in the archipelago. Raja Ampat is a local language for Four Kings. In terms of history, Raja Ampat Archipelago in the 15th century was part of the reign of Tidore Sultanate, a great kingdom centered in Moluccas Islands. The Sultanate of Tidore appointed 4 local kings to rule the islands of Waigeo, Batanta, Salawati and Misool, which are the four largest islands to this day. The term 4 Kings who rule the islands became the root of the name Raja Ampat.

We spent the whole week in Raja Ampat. We were a group of 6, sailing on a wooden boat to explore the archipelago. This is the best way to explore the area: since it is an archipelago, you need to spend most of your days on or in the water to get the best experience of Raja Ampat.

Raja Ampat is claimed to boast the richest marine biodiversity in the world.

clown fish coral reef 0000 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Right from the moment I arrived in the islands, I couldn’t stop my admiration of the beautiful surroundings – its breathtaking landscape and waters just blew my mind away.

naturist 0001 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Many locals claimed these islands to be a paradise on Earth, and I must agree with that statement!

islands view 0004 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

We started from the central islands of the archipelago.

islands view 0003 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

We were presented with a wide array of beautiful corals from the first days.

coral reef 0008 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

They were very colorful and in good shape

coral reef 0007 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

– encouraging to see that in the age when many coral reefs suffer from bleaching due to pollution.

coral reef 0000 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

The fish too were no less colorful, as if they were competing to win the best outfit.

coral reef 0002 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Merely by snorkeling, you can see the best of Raja Ampat.

naturist 0005 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Yes, you need very minimal 😉 gear to enjoy all that extraordinary underwater world!

naturist 0007 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

The next days were spent venturing northbound

islands view 0007 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

to get to Wayag –

islands view 0010 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

the jungle covered islets, that often appear in the internet as a classic example of ‘tropical paradise’.

islands view 0006 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Swimming, snorkeling, sunbathing, fishing, are among the things you could enjoy in the sailing trips… In Raja Ampat, you can even feed sharks and swim with them too!

shark coral reef 0000 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Well, they weren’t that huge, but at first it was scary and made me nervous… Soon enough though, I found myself mingle with those sharks at ease, which was quite fascinating.

There are lodges on the bigger islands, and some of them offer full packages, where you can do a lot of water activities. But for me, sailing trip seemed to be the best way to experience Raja Ampat, as it allowed to wander as far as we wanted.

islands view 0012 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

It was also great to have some breaks from being on/in the water, and explore the islands – even hiking naked in the tropical forest!

islands view 0008 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

While the rest of the group were not keen on disrobing, I managed to exercise some naturism, mostly away from the group. I must admit that I am a newbie to naturism, which prevented me from being myself and naked in the whole journey… but I still enjoyed a good portion of it in the buff! I still recall how nice it felt to be naked and let the tropical breeze sweep your skin.

naturist 0010 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

It was definitely hot, but enjoyable. As many have said, the sun is the best treatment.

naturist 0004 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

Best part? Of course swimming naked and snorkeling in the most beautiful underwater world!

naturist 0009 Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia

If you are keen on spending some of the best days of your life in this paradise, I would surely recommend you to visit the islands. The authorities restrict the number of tourists visiting the islands, which is actually nice, as you can enjoy the islands almost all to yourself when you get there, especially, once again, if you take a sailing trip. The crew of the boat might be not too familiar with naturism, if you want to make it a nude sailing trip, but I think they’d be open enough if you could explain it to them.

 

text and imagery by Miko